Day 10: Tweet ‘smart’

tweet smart

 

Now that we have reached the final day of this course #UCD10DoT and you are embarking on your journey in the Twittersphere it seems appropriate to offer you guidance on Twitter etiquette so you can continue to tweet smart.

 

 

 

Dos & Don't 2

Tweet Smart: Takeaway Guidelines

  1. Be patient it takes time to build up a network on Twitter, continue after this course to tweet for 5-10 minutes daily and see your network grow. 
  2. In your tweets, where appropriate, use hashtags before keywords, RT, DM and @mentions.  
  3. Remember it is a two-way conversation, get involved and share and comment relevant to the conversation. 
  4. Explore Twitter apps and third-party clients to manage your twitter experience e.g.  hootsuite, tweetdeck etc.

Although we’ve reached the end of this course, we hope it is not the end of your Twitter journey. Don’t worry if you’re still catching up – the course materials will continue to be available. Do keep in touch with us (and each other) via @UCDTL, @aine_galvin and @leonegately – we will still be on Twitter to engage further. We hope you’ve found the course useful, and thanks for participating throughout. Keep tweeting!

If you have experimented with Twitter and have decided that it’s not for you, then we hope we’ve helped you come to an informed decision on whether to use it or not. If you want to delete your account, its easy to do so. We encourage you to keep your digital footprint tidy.

Todays_Task_Day10

 

Further readings on using Twitter in academic contexts

Darling ES, Shiffman D, Côté IM, Drew JA. (2013). The role of Twitter in the life cycle of a scientific publication. PeerJ PrePrints 1:e16v1 http://dx.doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.16v1   

Lupton D. ‘Feeling Better Connected’: Academics’ Use of Social Media. News & Media Research Centre. University of Canberra, Australia. 2014. Available at: http://www.canberra.edu.au/faculties/arts-design/attachments/pdf/n-and-mrc/Feeling-Better-Connected-report-final.pdf

Mollett, Moran & Dunleavy (2011). Using Twitter in university research, impact and teaching activities: A guide for academics and researchers. LSE Public Policy Group. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/files/2011/11/Published-Twitter_Guide_Sept_2011.pdf

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